What do you think of that school on www.greyschool.com

personally i like it, just love the Harry potter hogwart school concept with the 4 houses ;-)

im currently studding the wizard of History, i have read about imothep of Egypt, i like that school very much. so much thing to learn !

message from the headmaster Oberon Zell Ravenheart on YouTube :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZ4zL_0UtUw

Tags: grey, of, school, wizardry

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well for now i dont have a bad experience with the school. i like the way it feel and i like the  professor very much, one of my friend from France have is Journeymen wizard certificate from the school, and he is now teaching in France.

what i like also is the school forum. so many thing to read about many subject .

we are now about 400 students in the school ;-) 

It feels far too stereotypical to me... and i feel like that would draw the wrong kind of... hype... Not saying it is a bad way of spreading knowledge... i just hope it is done in a way that is both truthful and intellectual.

well alex if you can give it a try if you want to see how the school look like and its only 12 $ a month, after that month you can give up if you dont like the school.

Wait. "Wizard certificate" ?  Are you serious???  Shame on Oberon.

Severinus said:

well for now i dont have a bad experience with the school. i like the way it feel and i like the  professor very much, one of my friend from France have is Journeymen wizard certificate from the school, and he is now teaching in France.

what i like also is the school forum. so many thing to read about many subject .

we are now about 400 students in the school ;-) 

Which project is it they are not supporting exactly? Is there only one such project allowed? Who approves such names or materials? What traditions are he claiming to teach and who is supposed to approve this stuff? Considering there is only one accredited school I am aware of right now just who is it that can answer those questions honestly and with authority? I only ask because different people have different ideas of what is legit and what isn't. It really wasn't that long ago that Wicca was considered so very not a legit religion, never mind as a legit school of magical practice. There are still some circles that don't consider it so.

There are also circles who believe if you are teaching Wicca online at all you must not be teaching inner circle information anyway. To do so would be against tradition. So either it would be fraudulent or it would be traitorous.  I personally don't care either way what is taught, how much, or when and how as long as what's taught can be historically backed up somewhere or proven in action somehow. I would, however, caution about getting too deep into finger pointing and nay saying without any specific details and examples laid out.

Sutra said:

Oberon is legit but his school is questionable. Most of his Grey Council have not approved use of their names or materials in connection with the school and do not support the project.

In effect, you are paying for Outer Court Materials that are not core or any tradition but being led to believe they are associated with those of the members of the grey Council.

Aside from coven support and supplies for your group or temple for instance, Wicca does not cost anything.

It's pretty on par with other online magic schools....which is to say, a rip off.

Don't most schools have some certificate of graduation? The name might be a little questionable but.. well... just saying....

Serafina said:

Wait. "Wizard certificate" ?  Are you serious???  Shame on Oberon.

Severinus said:

well for now i dont have a bad experience with the school. i like the way it feel and i like the  professor very much, one of my friend from France have is Journeymen wizard certificate from the school, and he is now teaching in France.

what i like also is the school forum. so many thing to read about many subject .

we are now about 400 students in the school ;-) 

I think Sutra means they don't support the school at all, and their names and materials are being used with out their specific approval.  Which is bad in any academical setting, since citation and support of said knowledge give more credit to it than the words simply strung together.   That being said it being the "only" accredited school does not mean it is credible...

Amber Fry said:

Which project is it they are not supporting exactly? Is there only one such project allowed? Who approves such names or materials? What traditions are he claiming to teach and who is supposed to approve this stuff? Considering there is only one accredited school I am aware of right now just who is it that can answer those questions honestly and with authority? I only ask because different people have different ideas of what is legit and what isn't. It really wasn't that long ago that Wicca was considered so very not a legit religion, never mind as a legit school of magical practice. There are still some circles that don't consider it so.

There are also circles who believe if you are teaching Wicca online at all you must not be teaching inner circle information anyway. To do so would be against tradition. So either it would be fraudulent or it would be traitorous.  I personally don't care either way what is taught, how much, or when and how as long as what's taught can be historically backed up somewhere or proven in action somehow. I would, however, caution about getting too deep into finger pointing and nay saying without any specific details and examples laid out.

More often than not the people who take issue with Wicca don't know what they're talking about. Commonly the gripes tend to be by someone who has an axe to grind about bad ol' initiates, and/or feel the need to legitimize their (also not so ancient) tradition, and/or whose only exposure to "Wicca" has been among eclectic/solitaries and also have an axe to grind.

Regardless, a "school of wizardry" has jack-all to do with Wicca, and Wicca has yet to be taught online. I won't speak for Sutra, rather to say I took her use of the term of "outer-court" in the general sense of basic introduction. YMMV.

My opinion: It's cute, possibly admirable,that the school was initially created to introduce *children* to general pagan & magick related topics. What child wouldn't want some semblance of Hogwarts. The only reservation is that doing so blurs the difference between fact & fantasy, especially when the Potter franchise has routinely been accused by right-wing nuts of promoting (actual) paganism & witchcraft. It's a fine line between useful and fueling the fire.

The fact adults glommed onto it and now are enrolled other than for shits n' giggles is rather... Can't quite find the right word, so I'll go with "unsettling." Witchcraft, magick, and paganism shouldn't need a sugar coated crutch. And the motif does nothing but undermine any legitimacy of material that might actually exist in what's offered. It's things like this that fuel the misinformation that continues to make Neopaganism in general still seem silly and fringe, and makes it that much harder to be recognized as a worthwhile segment of society.


Amber Fry said:

Which project is it they are not supporting exactly? Is there only one such project allowed? Who approves such names or materials? What traditions are he claiming to teach and who is supposed to approve this stuff? Considering there is only one accredited school I am aware of right now just who is it that can answer those questions honestly and with authority? I only ask because different people have different ideas of what is legit and what isn't. It really wasn't that long ago that Wicca was considered so very not a legit religion, never mind as a legit school of magical practice. There are still some circles that don't consider it so.

There are also circles who believe if you are teaching Wicca online at all you must not be teaching inner circle information anyway. To do so would be against tradition. So either it would be fraudulent or it would be traitorous.  I personally don't care either way what is taught, how much, or when and how as long as what's taught can be historically backed up somewhere or proven in action somehow. I would, however, caution about getting too deep into finger pointing and nay saying without any specific details and examples laid out.

Sutra said:

Oberon is legit but his school is questionable. Most of his Grey Council have not approved use of their names or materials in connection with the school and do not support the project.

In effect, you are paying for Outer Court Materials that are not core or any tradition but being led to believe they are associated with those of the members of the grey Council.

Aside from coven support and supplies for your group or temple for instance, Wicca does not cost anything.

It's pretty on par with other online magic schools....which is to say, a rip off.

How is this school accredited? Cherry Hill Seminary has been around far longer and with bonafide educators holding recognized Masters and PhDs from accredited established universities and it's still in the multi-year process of accreditation. What traditions let alone other educational institutions recognise its wizardry certificates?

Or did you simply mean it hands out its own certificates?



Alex said:

I think Sutra means they don't support the school at all, and their names and materials are being used with out their specific approval.  Which is bad in any academical setting, since citation and support of said knowledge give more credit to it than the words simply strung together.   That being said it being the "only" accredited school does not mean it is credible...

Accredited by whom? The only accredited online pagan school is Cherry Hill Seminary.

Alex said:

I think Sutra means they don't support the school at all, and their names and materials are being used with out their specific approval.  Which is bad in any academical setting, since citation and support of said knowledge give more credit to it than the words simply strung together.   That being said it being the "only" accredited school does not mean it is credible...

Amber Fry said:

Which project is it they are not supporting exactly? Is there only one such project allowed? Who approves such names or materials? What traditions are he claiming to teach and who is supposed to approve this stuff? Considering there is only one accredited school I am aware of right now just who is it that can answer those questions honestly and with authority? I only ask because different people have different ideas of what is legit and what isn't. It really wasn't that long ago that Wicca was considered so very not a legit religion, never mind as a legit school of magical practice. There are still some circles that don't consider it so.

There are also circles who believe if you are teaching Wicca online at all you must not be teaching inner circle information anyway. To do so would be against tradition. So either it would be fraudulent or it would be traitorous.  I personally don't care either way what is taught, how much, or when and how as long as what's taught can be historically backed up somewhere or proven in action somehow. I would, however, caution about getting too deep into finger pointing and nay saying without any specific details and examples laid out.

I agree with this. I realize I come of as argumentative at times but my main goal is almost always to get people to stop and think, not so much just be contrary. Sometimes people make statements that seem like there is a misunderstanding of terms or confusion of terms... I'm not sure that is exactly right either but that is pretty close.

Either way, it seems this country (the states) that I live in seems to be on a PC high whitewashed with some odd over protection ideals. I keep saying its better to let the truth of the matter out so all this misrepresentation and imagined nastiness will just not happen so much. Granted there are people out there who will abuse the truth but they will be better recognized if the majority is well informed. 

As to the school conflict (if there really is one), I honestly would hope most reasonable adults would see it for what it is anyway. I think the idea that adults might enjoy lightening up and playing like children would be obvious here. There is a special type of magic in such things and I don't see anything wrong with letting that happen as long as everyone is clear that is what is going on. Or might that be the majority of this issue? Perhaps adding a little too much fantasy to life without such clear distinctions is a bad idea?


Callisto said:

More often than not the people who take issue with Wicca don't know what they're talking about. Commonly the gripes tend to be by someone who has an axe to grind about bad ol' initiates, and/or feel the need to legitimize their (also not so ancient) tradition, and/or whose only exposure to "Wicca" has been among eclectic/solitaries and also have an axe to grind.

Regardless, a "school of wizardry" has jack-all to do with Wicca, and Wicca has yet to be taught online. I won't speak for Sutra, rather to say I took her use of the term of "outer-court" in the general sense of basic introduction. YMMV.

My opinion: It's cute, possibly admirable,that the school was initially created to introduce *children* to general pagan & magick related topics. What child wouldn't want some semblance of Hogwarts. The only reservation is that doing so blurs the difference between fact & fantasy, especially when the Potter franchise has routinely been accused by right-wing nuts of promoting (actual) paganism & witchcraft. It's a fine line between useful and fueling the fire.

The fact adults glommed onto it and now are enrolled other than for shits n' giggles is rather... Can't quite find the right word, so I'll go with "unsettling." Witchcraft, magick, and paganism shouldn't need a sugar coated crutch. And the motif does nothing but undermine any legitimacy of material that might actually exist in what's offered. It's things like this that fuel the misinformation that continues to make Neopaganism in general still seem silly and fringe, and makes it that much harder to be recognized as a worthwhile segment of society.


Amber Fry said:

Which project is it they are not supporting exactly? Is there only one such project allowed? Who approves such names or materials? What traditions are he claiming to teach and who is supposed to approve this stuff? Considering there is only one accredited school I am aware of right now just who is it that can answer those questions honestly and with authority? I only ask because different people have different ideas of what is legit and what isn't. It really wasn't that long ago that Wicca was considered so very not a legit religion, never mind as a legit school of magical practice. There are still some circles that don't consider it so.

There are also circles who believe if you are teaching Wicca online at all you must not be teaching inner circle information anyway. To do so would be against tradition. So either it would be fraudulent or it would be traitorous.  I personally don't care either way what is taught, how much, or when and how as long as what's taught can be historically backed up somewhere or proven in action somehow. I would, however, caution about getting too deep into finger pointing and nay saying without any specific details and examples laid out.

Sutra said:

Oberon is legit but his school is questionable. Most of his Grey Council have not approved use of their names or materials in connection with the school and do not support the project.

In effect, you are paying for Outer Court Materials that are not core or any tradition but being led to believe they are associated with those of the members of the grey Council.

Aside from coven support and supplies for your group or temple for instance, Wicca does not cost anything.

It's pretty on par with other online magic schools....which is to say, a rip off.

Recently over at Patheos there was an article that observed that the religious scandals that tend to take over the headlines are not committed by pagans or pagans leaders but by those who sanctimoniously proclaim religious superiority; and that what works to our advantage (collectively as a group of religions) is that we don't try to hide what we're about:

 

"The difference in our raucous behavior and what you see in the news is that we do ours proud, out loud, and often, in a crowd. With nothing to hide or pretend about, it is not nearly as interesting to the world at large. It is when you cloak your excesses and pleasures in the darkness of deceit and haughty sanctimony that the world will most assuredly laugh when you fall...

Our Lesson: Keep living vibrantly and fully and do it without apology. Harm as few as you can on your path, mind your own challenges and business more than you tend to the challenges and business of others, and do not let the many potholes of wealth trip you up as you acquire your own prosperity."


I don't' think there's anything wrong with having a bit of fun or fantasy. I would argue that, more often than not, pagans rather enjoy past times like science fiction, fantasy, gaming and the like and are usually up for a bit of revelry whether it's a typical outdoor barbeque or munching on turkey legs while walking around in costume at a Renn faire.

But I think the concept of "there is a time and place" to be serious and when to cut loose is generally valued as well. Personally, I have no problem with a group who decides to conduct their private rituals dressed like inhabitants of Middle Earth or like attendees of an ancient Greek symposium, or decide they're going to "meet" in a second life virtual world. By all means have fun, gowds speed. However, that's not the norm nor anything anyone with a level head would remotely think is an accurate depiction of what pagan religions are about or what should be presented as genuine to religious or magickal practices. Particularly when the existing negative stereotypes tend to range from dark ages imagery of "wizards n' witches" to modern-day role-playing hollywood witches. It's an act of futility to expect respect as real practitioners of valid practices while playing into (or playing up) such fallacies.

And if such a crutch is viewed as needed by some adults in order to get into and learn about paganism and witchcraft, that these practices need to be made "fun" (as though they're somehow dour to begin with),  then there's an issue and it is not with the practices themselves. 


Amber Fry said:

I agree with this. I realize I come of as argumentative at times but my main goal is almost always to get people to stop and think, not so much just be contrary. Sometimes people make statements that seem like there is a misunderstanding of terms or confusion of terms... I'm not sure that is exactly right either but that is pretty close.

Either way, it seems this country (the states) that I live in seems to be on a PC high whitewashed with some odd over protection ideals. I keep saying its better to let the truth of the matter out so all this misrepresentation and imagined nastiness will just not happen so much. Granted there are people out there who will abuse the truth but they will be better recognized if the majority is well informed. 

As to the school conflict (if there really is one), I honestly would hope most reasonable adults would see it for what it is anyway. I think the idea that adults might enjoy lightening up and playing like children would be obvious here. There is a special type of magic in such things and I don't see anything wrong with letting that happen as long as everyone is clear that is what is going on. Or might that be the majority of this issue? Perhaps adding a little too much fantasy to life without such clear distinctions is a bad idea?

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