RealPagan- Paganism for the Real World

One thing which people often forget is that the Rede is the WICCAN Rede and appropriately only applies to Wiccans. Other paths and individuals might chose to use the Rede as a guideline, but they are certainly under no obligation to do so.

That is not of course, to say that other Pagan paths don't have their own ethical teachings to follow or that by not following the Rede they are somehow "Bad". Several of the paths that I know of have very specific sets of values which guide their ethical choices as the Rede guides the choices of Wiccans.

For the Asatruar the guidelines are called the Nine Noble Virtues and in many ways they are more like the warrior code that might have been followed by a Viking in actual Pagan society.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/bos/bos653.htm

Kemetic (Egyptian) Reconstructionists base their values on the Laws of Ma'at, many of which are taken directly from temple texts left from ancient Egypt. http://www.isisoasis.org/temp1/docs/laws.htm Living according to Ma'at we extemely important to an ancient Egyptian since failure to do so could result in his soul's destruction upon his death. Sekhmet was a goddess whose purpose was to defend Ma'at. (Ma'at here being both a Goddess and a term which could be translated as "right living".)

Hellenic (Greek) Reconstructionists try to follow the ethical codes discussed in surviving texts from ancient Greece. These laws primarily addressed the virtues of family and community. Interestingly to the ancient Greeks, strangers were not necessarily to be treated with the same ethical behavior as those of family or community. http://www.ecauldron.com/greekethics.php

Celtic Reconstructionists also draw from what is known of Celtic society, while acknowledging that some of the values of the ancient Celts may not fit well into modern society. http://www.newtara.org/newtara_lib_ethics002.asp

Modern Druids have taken the ancient Brehon laws, many of which were written down by early Christian monks, and modified them to be more in keeping with modern society. Here's a good article on that. http://www.newtara.org/newtara_lib_ethics001.asp

And finally for those that follow the Religio Romano (Roman Reconstructionists) there are virtues and values which actually have been handed down in the surviving writings of Roman philosophers, and which seem very applicable even in today's society. http://www.novaroma.org/wiki/Roman_Virtues

So I think that it is important that those who have not perhaps been exposed to the teachings of Pagan religions other than Wicca realize that when someone says to you "I don't follow the Rede" it does not mean that they are dishonorable or unethical. Rather than going ewwwww, it would be more appropriate to ask them what they consider to be the ethical virtues and guidelines of the path they follow. You might just be surprised.

-Lark-

Views: 1080

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Great post! :D
Thanks for this post Lark....this makes me think of a book I just finished called A Witch's 10 Commandments-by Marian Singer....it is just a guideline of good ethics and I thoroughly enjoyed the book and felt that all the guidelines were very worthwhile to follow..but someone suggested that it is just a mishmash of different belief systems and that I should be skeptical and that all we really need is the Wiccan Rede...well that is all well and good and I do think the Wiccan Rede is very esteemable but I am not Wiccan...but I did think for a split second...that maybe this book is not worth reading then..it seems like I am constantly hearing don't read this book or that author...it can get a bit frustrating for a newbie..so I decided to listen to my own intuition on it and let that govern me rather than just take the word of every voice out there...if something feels right to me or speaks truth to me well I think that is the best voice I can listen to.
Wonderful post, once again, Lark!

Honestly, I think that no matter what Pagan path one follows, one should read the ethics of other paths as well... At least to avoid misunderstandings, if not to enrich one's knowledge.

I'm going to read every single one of those links right now, for instance. *off reading - do not disturb*
A book on Pagan ethics (not confined to Wicca) that we used to use as mandatory reading for my own students was "When, Why...If" by Robin Wood. It's well worth reading and then actually doing the exercises at the end of the chapters. Many people have difficulties with the fact that Pagan ethics can be somewhat situational and don't understand how to make best-choice ethics work for them. The book is a big help in doing this.

Another book that I found very helpful was "Ethics for the New Millennium by the Dalai Lama. I always suggest that people look at many different ethical viewpoints because they will help you decide was is ethically right for you. And in the end it's all about personal responsibility for our actions.

You might also find the articles about ethics on Judy Harrow's website interesting to read. http://www.proteuscoven.org/proteus/library.htm

-Lark-


Jennifer said:
Thanks for this post Lark....this makes me think of a book I just finished called A Witch's 10 Commandments-by Marian Singer....it is just a guideline of good ethics and I thoroughly enjoyed the book and felt that all the guidelines were very worthwhile to follow..but someone suggested that it is just a mishmash of different belief systems and that I should be skeptical and that all we really need is the Wiccan Rede...well that is all well and good and I do think the Wiccan Rede is very esteemable but I am not Wiccan...but I did think for a split second...that maybe this book is not worth reading then..it seems like I am constantly hearing don't read this book or that author...it can get a bit frustrating for a newbie..so I decided to listen to my own intuition on it and let that govern me rather than just take the word of every voice out there...if something feels right to me or speaks truth to me well I think that is the best voice I can listen to.
Thanks for the suggestions Lark:) I actually have the book by Robin Wood on my book wishlist!



Lark said:
A book on Pagan ethics (not confined to Wicca) that we used to use as mandatory reading for my own students was "When, Why...If" by Robin Wood. It's well worth reading and then actually doing the exercises at the end of the chapters. Many people have difficulties with the fact that Pagan ethics can be somewhat situational and don't understand how to make best-choice ethics work for them. The book is a big help in doing this.

Another book that I found very helpful was "Ethics for the New Millennium by the Dalai Lama. I always suggest that people look at many different ethical viewpoints because they will help you decide was is ethically right for you. And in the end it's all about personal responsibility for our actions.

You might also find the articles about ethics on Judy Harrow's website interesting to read. http://www.proteuscoven.org/proteus/library.htm

-Lark-


Jennifer said:
Thanks for this post Lark....this makes me think of a book I just finished called A Witch's 10 Commandments-by Marian Singer....it is just a guideline of good ethics and I thoroughly enjoyed the book and felt that all the guidelines were very worthwhile to follow..but someone suggested that it is just a mishmash of different belief systems and that I should be skeptical and that all we really need is the Wiccan Rede...well that is all well and good and I do think the Wiccan Rede is very esteemable but I am not Wiccan...but I did think for a split second...that maybe this book is not worth reading then..it seems like I am constantly hearing don't read this book or that author...it can get a bit frustrating for a newbie..so I decided to listen to my own intuition on it and let that govern me rather than just take the word of every voice out there...if something feels right to me or speaks truth to me well I think that is the best voice I can listen to.
Ooh, lots of stuff for me to eat...I mean, read. Thanks for posting! :D
I personally am not a fan of the NNV, though I'm a Heathen. They are ostensibly gleaned from the Havamal, though I'm not sure why those nine in particular were chosen. When I read the Havamal, I distill values from it that appear more important than "industriousness", for example. Like moderation. And wit. These are big, important virtues in the Havamal, but ignored in the NNV. Irritating. I'm not sure why the NNV gets such big press.
Still loving this thread! :)

Thank you Lark for posting this information. I enjoyed reading them and particularly liked the 'Laws of ma'at'. As an Eclectic I am still trying to find myself - spiritually speaking. I found this post interesting and a useful source that I shall refer to often in the future.

Kind regards and Blessings.

Chris

Is it okay to have and, or form your own set of rules/guidelines?
Certainly it would be appropriate to do that.  After all, when all is said and done we each have to decide for ourselves what we consider right or wrong and live out lives accordingly.  And I rather like the idea of thinking of our ethical beliefs as guidelines because what might be right and ethical in one situation might not be in another.

Lluella Clover said:
Is it okay to have and, or form your own set of rules/guidelines?

Thank you and I agree. Especially, with so many different types of individuals out there. I keep finding I have to change whatever rules I generally keep to in order to be able to deal with comes up.


Lark said:

Certainly it would be appropriate to do that.  After all, when all is said and done we each have to decide for ourselves what we consider right or wrong and live out lives accordingly.  And I rather like the idea of thinking of our ethical beliefs as guidelines because what might be right and ethical in one situation might not be in another.

Lluella Clover said:
Is it okay to have and, or form your own set of rules/guidelines?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

CURRENT MOON

© 2014   Created by Sangraal.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

The Pagan Top Sites List